Bibliography

A bibliography is a list of all works used to write the essay, not just those cited in the essay. It is arranged alphabetically according to the first author’s surname. Whereas you placed the first names or initials first in the footnote, in the bibliography the surname will come first. Also, unlike in the footnote, the bibliography includes the name of the publisher. The following is an example of a bibliography for the discipline of History:

Rules

Do not number your entries or use dot points.

1.5 or double space the entire reference list

Put all reference items in hanging indent format.

Insert an additional line space between references for readability.

Example

Bibliography

Primary sources

Argus (Melbourne).
Calvin, John Institutes of the Christian Religion, reproduced in ‘Social and religious dissent, 1381–1559’, UNE History 110 Study Guide 1, Armidale, 1989, pp. 79–81.
Sellar, A. M. (trans.) Bede’s Ecclesiastical History of England, London, 1907, in Christian Classics Ethereal Library, http://www.ccel.org/b/bede/history/htm/v.vi.htm, accessed 14 September 2014.
Sydney Morning Herald.
Weir, Peter (director) Gallipoli (video recording), Sydney, Associated R and R Films, 1981.

Secondary sources

Ballarat Fine Art Gallery and University of Ballarat, ‘Eureka’, updated February 1999, http://www.amol.org.au/eureka/gallery1/index.htm, accessed 14 November 2014.
Belcher, Michael J. ‘The child in New South Wales society: 1820–1837’, unpublished Ph.D. thesis, University of New England, Armidale, 1982.
Cohn, Norman The Pursuit of the Millennium, 2nd edn, New York, Oxford University Press, 1970.
Frontier: Stories from White Australia’s Forgotten War (CD-ROM), Sydney, Australian Broadcasting Corporation, 1997.
Goldberg, Sander M. ‘Plautus on the Palatine’, Journal of Roman Studies, vol. 88, 1998, pp. 1–20.
Oakley, Francis ‘Pierre d’Ailly and papal infallibility’, Medieval Studies, vol. 26, 1964, pp. 353–58.
Pollock, Sir Frederick and Maitland, Frederic William The History of English Law, 2nd edn, 2 vols, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1898.
Rosenthal, Joel T. The Purchase of Paradise, London, Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1972.
Rosenthal, Joel T. ‘When did you last see your grandfather?’, in Crown, Government and People in the Fifteenth Century, Rowena E. Archer (ed.), Stroud, Alan Sutton, 1995, pp. 223–44.
Runciman, Steven A History of the Crusades, 3 vols, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1951–54.
Smail, R.C. Crusading Warfare (1097–1193), Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1956.
Thomson, Alistair ‘A past you can live with: Digger memories and the Anzac legend’, Oral History Association of Australia, no. 13, 1991, pp. 12–18, reproduced in ‘Australians through two centuries’, UNE History 154 Resource Materials–Book 2, Armidale 2001, pp. 27–33.
Vaughan, Richard Philip the Bold, London, Longman, 1962.

 

The placing of Peter Weir’s movie among the primary sources indicates that it was used to make a point about movies. Had it been used to make a point about the Gallipoli campaign it would have been placed among the secondary sources.

Ensure that your citation refers to the place of publication and not to the place of printing.

The corporate identity of publishers (such as Company, Limited, Incorporated, Propriety, Group) is never included.

 

In the Bibliography, I do not number entries or use dot points.
Correct!

 

True or False: For my Secondary sources, I must ensure that my citation refers to the place of publication and not to the place of printing?
True!

 

The corporate identity of publishers (such as Company, Limited, Incorporated, Propriety, Group) is never included.
Correct!

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