Plagiarism overview

Icon_Your_WorkIn your academic journey, you will discover that you are often required to do two simple but related things: study the work already done by others, and at the same time show that you are capable of building upon this work in an autonomous way. As the great educator Confucius said, “Anyone who learns but does not think is lost. Anyone who thinks but does not learn is in great danger” (Lunyu 2.15 ). You have to show respect both to the original work of those who have come before you (the “learning” to which Confucius refers) and to your own original contribution (the “thinking” of which Confucius speaks).

This means that you have to clearly distinguish between your own contribution and the work, words and ideas of others. If you give the impression that what is actually the work of others is your own work, then you are plagiarising — even if you do this unintentionally. So you need to be very careful about proper referencing in the relevant assessment tasks, because plagiarism will be penalised.1

 1. University of New England Avoiding plagiarism and academic misconduct. Advice for students guideline, http://policies.une.edu.au/view.current.php?id=00258, accessed 24 December 2015.
 
This image is a person with a speech bubble that says "Fairness means being fair both to others and to yourself."

Check your understanding of plagiarism

Select your responses to the following examples:

 

Straight/verbatim copying

 

Incorrect paraphrasing

 

Intellectual theft and collusion

 

Self-plagiarism

 

This image is of a person with a speech bubble that says "How did you go with your self-check?Were you clear about intentional and unintentional plagiarism?

If so, then that is great, but If you weren’t then you might need to re-read the information and take the activity again.

Take your time to clarify your understanding. Plagiarism is avoidable!


Remember, plagiarism includes:

  • Copying any material from books, journals, study notes or recordings, the web, electronic storage media, the work of other students, or any other source without indicating this in a manner appropriate to the discipline;
  • Directly quoting or rephrasing ideas from books, journals, study notes or recordings, the web, electronic storage media, the work of other students, or any other source without acknowledging the source of those ideas by footnotes or citations; or
  • Conspiring with others to produce work that is presented misleadingly as your own independent work.
Avoiding plagiarism

 

For more detailed information, visit the Academic Skills website on plagiarism.

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